Miracles Happen After Hard Work by Mother Alla (Philadelphia Eleven)

by Helene Swanson

Mother Alla at Bear Haven in Rosa Mystica.

Mother Alla at Bear Haven in Rosa Mystica.

As I was en route to Springfield, IL, to call upon the Illinois General Assembly to Vote YES so that Illinois could be the first state in the 21st Century to Ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, dearest Mother Alla, the Rev. Alla Bozarth sent me this beautiful poem she wrote to be share will all of you.

Knowing that Rep. Lou Lang will be pushing it forward this coming 2015 Legislative Session.  We shall not give up, we shall not give in.  United We Stand… All coming to the table… One Nation Indivisible.

Check out her blog from time to time http://allabozarthwordsandimages.blogspot.com/

Miracles Happen After Hard Work

Miracles happen—

the French took charge and cast out the Nazis

from the City of Lights, when the Occupying Germans feared

the approach of the Allies and tried to force a 9pm curfew

on the citizens of Paris.

 

Occupation, if it is benign, is one thing, but a curfew is an outrage.

The police took over a building opposite the Cathedral of Notre Dame

and then the women and children came out and started hurling their rocks

and the men shot tanks with small guns, and de Gaulle begged Eisenhower

to bring in the Allies, which he had formerly refused to do.

 

Impressed with the suddenly aggressive valor of the French,

the General agreed to follow a band of French troops into Paris,

and when they arrived, a Victory Parade was already underway

as the Liberation of Paris had officially happened the day before.

 

A distant humming reached the ears of the Americans,

a strange sound rising to a low murmur as they came nearer,

then erupting into an overwhelming roar of jubilation.

The people of Paris rushed on foot to greet them, women kissed them,

some offered wine to the soldiers, they climbed up onto the tanks,

hailing the Liberation of the City of Lights in the summer of 1944.

 

On the same day, August 26, twenty-four years before,

the Women’s Suffrage Amendment was written into the Constitution

of the United States, a victory for humanity created by the relentless

courage, effort and suffering of American women for generations.

 

By virtue of those heroic Suffragists, on June 4, 1919,

the Nineteenth Amendment had been passed by both

the House and Senate of Congress,

but it needed to be ratified by state legislatures.

 

Over a year later, on August 18th the deciding state

was Tennessee, the 36th state to cast its vote in favor,

and the deciding vote was cast by Harry Burn,

at twenty-four the youngest state legislator.

 

Mother Alla celebrates Mass.

Mother Alla celebrates Mass.

 

That morning he’d opened his mail and read a letter

from his mother, in which she said she’d been watching

to see him declare his inclination toward Suffrage for Women,

but so far she saw nothing. She ended her message,

“Don’t forget to be a good boy . . .  and vote for suffrage.”

 

Supporters of suffrage wore yellow roses and filled the balcony

while opponents wore red roses on the main floor.

Harry Burn walked in wearing red, but when he voted,

he said “Aye.”

 

All the women in the balcony threw down

their flowers, and on that day,

there was a beautiful storm of yellow roses

raining all over the representatives

of the state of Tennessee.

 

Alla Renée Bozarth

 

From Purgatory Papers, copyright 2014.

All rights reserved.

Immediately after the Philadelphia Ordinations, this picture was taken with the red doors of the Church of the Advocate opened wide to welcome and host the historic event. The Rector, the Rev. Paul Washington, understood that the risks were great, both to himself and to the church, which at the time was dependent on diocesan funding to meet its expenses. Counter-clockwise from upper right are my husband and priest presenter, the Rev. Phil Bozarth-Campbell, Dorothy Huyck, naturalist, feminist and historian, and her daughter Heather Huyck, who was writing her University of Minnesota American Studies doctoral dissertation on the History of Women's Ordination in the Episcopal Church. I, deacon of the Diocese of Oregon since September 8, 1971 and, as of that day on the Feast of Saints Mary and Martha, July 29, 1974 in hot Philadelphia, priest as well, though I had transferred to the Diocese of Minnesota for the years I served there. I do not know the identity of the woman on my left who was so gloriously harmonious with the colors of the occasion. She was observing the process, and I pulled her into the picture. I am sorry not to know her name. If anyone recognizes her, please let me know about her! - Mother Alla

Immediately after the Philadelphia Ordinations, this picture was taken with the red doors of the Church of the Advocate opened wide to welcome and host the historic event. The Rector, the Rev. Paul Washington, understood that the risks were great, both to himself and to the church, which at the time was dependent on diocesan funding to meet its expenses. Counter-clockwise from upper right are my husband and priest presenter, the Rev. Phil Bozarth-Campbell, Dorothy Huyck, naturalist, feminist and historian, and her daughter Heather Huyck, who was writing her University of Minnesota American Studies doctoral dissertation on the History of Women’s Ordination in the Episcopal Church. I, deacon of the Diocese of Oregon since September 8, 1971 and, as of that day on the Feast of Saints Mary and Martha, July 29, 1974 in hot Philadelphia, priest as well, though I had transferred to the Diocese of Minnesota for the years I served there. I do not know the identity of the woman on my left who was so gloriously harmonious with the colors of the occasion. She was observing the process, and I pulled her into the picture. I am sorry not to know her name. If anyone recognizes her, please let me know about her! – Mother Alla

 

 

 

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